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Pupil premium strategy statement 2021-22

This statement details our school’s use of pupil premium (and recovery premium for the 2021 to 2022 academic year) funding to help improve the attainment of our disadvantaged pupils.

It outlines our pupil premium strategy, how we intend to spend the funding in this academic year and the effect that last year’s spending of pupil premium had within our school.

School overview

Detail Data
School name Stepney All Saints Secondary School
Number of pupils in school 1026
Proportion (%) of pupil premium eligible pupils 48%
Academic year/years that our current pupil premium strategy plan covers (3 year plans are recommended) 2020-2023
Date this statement was published 13.12.21
Date on which it will be reviewed 30.09.22
Statement authorised by P Woods
Pupil premium lead Shiulee Begum
Governor / Trustee lead Anne Slater

Funding overview

Detail Amount
Pupil premium funding allocation this academic year £542,440
Recovery premium funding allocation this academic year £82,360
Pupil premium funding carried forward from previous years (enter £0 if not applicable) £0
Total budget for this academic year

If your school is an academy in a trust that pools this funding, state the amount available to your school this academic year

£624,800

Part A: Pupil premium strategy plan

Statement of intent

The ultimate objective for our disadvantaged pupils is to remove all barriers in order to have the opportunity to achieve their potential. The Pupil Premium strategy at Stepney All Saints School aims to address challenges impacting on attendance, access to learning, mental health and well-being, literacy and numeracy skills, opportunities for cultural capital in addition to the loss of learning during lockdown and isolation periods in the previous academic year.

We continue to focus on developing pre-learning and AAE (Application, analysis and evaluations) as the bedrock to a robust and challenging curriculum as well as widening participation in order to maintain or exceed the performance of our pupil premium (PP) pupils compared to those nationally. These strategies underpin the wider school vision of eliminating gaps for all pupils so that they flourish. We further commit to embedding and reviewing the whole school curriculum strategy to ensure that it is fair, unbiased and representative of the whole school community. Our student focused environment coupled with an ethos of self-reflection and evaluation through our careers programme, strives to improve the life chances of all pupils regardless of their backgrounds.

Challenges

This details the key challenges to achievement that we have identified among our disadvantaged pupils.

Challenge number Detail of challenge
1 High percentage (45%) of PP pupils have English as an additional language
2 Underachievement due to loss learning during lockdown and isolation periods  
3 The attendance and participation of PP Students to enrichment activities / wider extra-curricular experiences
4 In-school analysis of progress data shows that there is a gap in performance of PP vs non-PP performance, with PP performing less well, and PP final outcomes are reliant upon the intervention plans in place
5 Average attendance of PP pupils 96.3% (overall attendance was 96.8%) Disadvantaged pupils’ lack of access to appropriate facilities and extra – curricular activities

Intended outcomes

This explains the outcomes we are aiming for by the end of our current strategy plan, and how we will measure whether they have been achieved.

Intended outcome Success criteria
Pupils eligible for PP in KS3 to make at least expected progress in English, Maths and Science 90% of Students eligible for PP in KS3 to make expected progress to meet their end of year predictions.
To close the gap in achievement outcomes  at GCSE in English, Maths and Science for students eligible for PP Students eligible for PP in Year 11 to achieve Maths, English and Science GCSEs in line with non PP students
Improved attitude to learning from the identified students. A reduction in the number of logged concerns. 100% attendance for tutoring programme.
All PP pupils participate in enrichment and extracurricular activities Each PP pupil takes up minimum of one extra-curricular activity
Close the gap between the mock and final examinations for PP pupils Gap between PP and non-PP pupils is minimal

 Activity in this academic year

This details how we intend to spend our pupil premium (and recovery premium funding) this academic year to address the challenges listed above.

Teaching (for example, CPD, recruitment and retention)

Budgeted cost: £76,639

Activity Evidence that supports this approach Challenge number(s) addressed
1. Employ and use new TAs to provide literacy and numeracy intervention to support sustained improvement in Year 7/8 We have a large number of pupils with EHCP’s in the current Yr7 and Yr8 cohorts. We know that they were further disadvantaged by the transition into secondary school due to the pandemic.

EEF research highlights the importance of effective deployment of support staff and the key role they can play in pupil outcomes.

https://educationendowmentfoundation.org.uk/education-evidence/guidance-reports/teaching-assistants

1, 2
2. Smaller teaching groups in English, Maths and Science Data shows that low attaining disadvantaged pupils do less well in English, Maths and Science

The EEF shows that one to one tuition and small group support have an impact on pupil attainment. Some studies suggest that progress is improved because of greater individual feedback from the teacher, more sustained the engagement, and work which is more closely matched to learners’ needs.

EEF-teaching-learning-toolkit/small-group-tuition

EEF-teaching-learning-toolkit/teaching-assistant-interventions

Closing-the-Gap  https://educationendowmentfoundation.org.uk/education-evidence/teaching-learning-toolkit/reducing-class-size

1,2,4
3. Ensure the Accelerated Reading programme is specifically targeted at PP pupils Analysis of GCSE and end of KS3 results showed that PP pupils did less well in English/literacy based subjects.

Evidence has shown that for “those who struggle, reading is particularly difficult and requires careful instruction and intervention. Problem areas must be determined, and instruction and intervention to address these areas must be carefully planned and delivered.”

https://improvingliteracy.org/brief/learning-read-simple-view-reading

EEF-guidance-reports/literacy-ks3-ks4/Simple_View_of_Reading.pdf

EEF-teaching-learning-toolkit/reading-comprehension-strategies

1,4
4. Embed schemes of learning to ensure KS3 curriculum is appropriate and assessments accurate to enhance progress at each key stage.  An extensive analysis of lost learning due to the pandemic has informed curriculum development. Drop-ins and pilot development reviews have identified differentiation to be a focus, This is most effective when middle leaders and responsibility holders are involved in the process.

 

2,4
5. Provide funding for Music Tuition for all those pupils eligible for Free School Meals A large proportion of our pupils don’t have access to playing an instrument due to the living conditions and affordability. Direct funding ensures pupils from disadvantaged backgrounds get access to tuition that is normally unaffordable

https://educationendowmentfoundation.org.uk/education-evidence/teaching-learning-toolkit/arts-participation

3

 Targeted academic support (for example, tutoring, one-to-one support structured interventions)

Budgeted cost: £476,780

Activity Evidence that supports this approach Challenge number(s) addressed
1. Deploy department  Academic Tutors to support in KS3 English, Mathematics and Science targeting PP for those impacted by lockdown and isolation periods Temporary academic tutors to be recruited during the year to support targeted pupils in lessons and offer 1-1/small group tuition out of school hours including morning clubs

The EEF shows that tutoring can have a high impact (up to 5 additional months progress) when the correct resources are provided and the staff are well supported and well trained. Having a lead to oversee this support will ensure that pupil outcomes are tracked carefully and the tuition adapted if and when needed.

EEF-education-evidence/teaching-learning-toolkit/one-to-one-tuition

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/school-led-tutoring-grant

2,4
2. Ensure intervention is targeted at PP (in class, withdrawal of groups and during extension sessions) Funding allows for smaller withdrawal groups and targeted, bespoke intervention

The EEF shows that one to one tuition and small group support have a moderate impact on pupil attainment. Some studies suggest that progress is improved because of greater individual feedback from the teacher, more sustained the engagement, and work which is more closely matched to learners’ needs.

EEF-teaching-learning-toolkit/small-group-tuition

 

4
3. Ensure that all Saturday and holiday classes target PP pupils for intervention Funding enables specific support to PP pupils and then benefit of additional tuition

https://educationendowmentfoundation.org.uk/education-evidence/teaching-learning-toolkit/extending-school-time

 

4
4. Year 6-7 transition summer programme Pupils with poor attendance from primary school including vulnerable pupils and SEND pupils are most likely to benefit from early intervention and set clear expectations

Tours of the school should acclimatise pupils to size. Pupils will have a one-day induction into school life with core subjects setting a summer project.

https://educationendowmentfoundation.org.uk/education-evidence/teaching-learning-toolkit/summer-schools

3,4
5. Ensure that a Homework Club is staffed by TAs for KS3 Direct funding for club targeting pupils with need. PP students are directly invited to attend clubs.

https://educationendowmentfoundation.org.uk/education-evidence/teaching-learning-toolkit/homework

1,4
6. Focus all extension, Half term and Easter revision classes for KS4 on the needs of PP students Direct intervention and revision targeted at PP pupils

https://educationendowmentfoundation.org.uk/education-evidence/teaching-learning-toolkit/extending-school-time

 

4

 Wider strategies (for example, related to attendance, behaviour, wellbeing)

Budgeted cost: £272,075

Activity Evidence that supports this approach Challenge number(s) addressed
1. Ensure there is a wide range of extra-curricular trips and activities

 

Evidence has shown that extra-curricular activities are particularly beneficial for developing pupil’s wider skills, especially when they complement the taught curriculum. Activities where pupils can learn to develop relevant skills such as teamwork, responsibility and perseverance are offered through a range of extra-curricular activities that all pupils can be invited to attend.

https://www.suttontrust.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/Life-Lessons-Report_FINAL.pdf

95% of PP are targeted to attend at least one club in the academic year.  Priority is given to PP students in order to access enrichment activities such as trips to the theatre and museums.

3
2. Provide opportunities for PP students to develop self-confidence and resilience through opportunities at the residential centre PP students have few opportunities to develop these skills in a residential setting and out of London (limited to 30 pupils) – this is a focus in the SIP in the Enrichment strategy

We will reintroduce trips designed to enrich curriculum areas with particular focus on use of the Mountain Centre

Research shows the positive impact school trips can have on academic attainment because of the key skills and problem solving skills it gives pupils access to.

https://www.lotc.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2010/12/Ofsted-Report-Oct-2008.pdf

Learning-Away-Comparative-Research-Report.pdf

the-impact-of-residential-trips

https://www.cumulusoutdoors.com/ofsteds-views-on-learning-outside-the-classroom/

 

3
3. Ensure the capacity of DSLs and the implementation of the Safeguard software and training Safeguarding is a priority for every member of staff in the school and this is reviewed at the start of each academic year. Teaching and support staff continue to promptly communicate safeguard concerns to the DSL in a confidential manner and should be able to use the Safeguard software 4,5
4. Re-introduce a Breakfast club at KS3 Direct funding for clubs targeting pupils with need.  PP students directly invited to attend clubs. 3,4
5. Embed the behaviour policy and Inclusion strategy Continue to embed the inclusion strategy so that all pupils return to mainstream lessons. There is a dual purpose for the SLC supporting students through referrals for behaviour and subject withdrawal

https://d2tic4wvo1iusb.cloudfront.net/eef-guidance-reports/behaviour/EEF_Improving_behaviour_in_schools_Summary.pdf

Pupils always have access to a safe space and consistent adults who have a range of expertise to help solve a range of problems. The team support pupils with their regulation, their emotional awareness, their sensory processing difficulties and their social understanding.

EEF- Behaviour interventions

EEFImprovingBehaviourinSchoolsEvidenceReview.pdf

5
6. Use of Behaviour Progress Officers to target PP pupils’ attendance to schools

 

Evidence shows that well-trained learning mentors have a positive impact on individual pupils, pupils often show improved motivation and engagement. The aim of the learning mentor is to break down barriers to learning by teaching key skills for life so that pupils can have access to a broader range of opportunities and they can reach their full potential.

https://www.teachingexpertise.com/articles/learning-mentors-improve-behaviour/

https://educationendowmentfoundation.org.uk/education-evidence/teaching-learning-toolkit/mentoring

Preventative approach to working with PP pupils who may become disaffected using PAPs including targeting pupils who have less than 96% attendance

5
7. Use school counselling service to provide drop-in service Concerns around increased need for well-being support because of pastoral contacts during lockdown. Use to support those who use the drop-ins to have high attendance and improved outlook on current situation and school

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/497825/Counselling_in_schools.pdf

 

3,5
8. Continue to use and monitor impact of new rewards system linked to academic attainment In order to positively affirm learning in the classroom and behaviour for learning we will continue to develop the breadth of rewards at Stepney All Saints School

More rewards for different students recognising all of their achievements.

3,4
9. Continue to use the merit process for reward and praise for targeted groups. Special focus on attendance rewards. We promote positive behaviour Pupil voice has consistently shown pupils value the reward system. They feel they should be rewarded for effort, progress and behaviour.

Improving behaviour in schools (d2tic4wvo1iusb.cloudfront.net)

5
10. Ensure the Careers programme is focussed on the needs of disaffected PP students Use a blended approach to include remote sessions To improve aspirations for all pupils to include the promotion of further and higher educational opportunities plus workplace opportunities.

The DfE requires all young people in secondary school have access to ‘an excellent programme of advice and guidance that is delivered by individuals with the right skills and experience’ and they reinforce that all young people should be able ‘to understand the full range of opportunities available to them, to learn from employers about work and learn the skills that are valued in the workplace and to have first-hand experience of the workplace.’  We believe that a whole-school approach is the best way to ensure that all pupils understand the world of work. When embedded from year 7, pupils are clear on the key skills needed for their own futures and can talk openly about their own aspirations for the future.

https://educationendowmentfoundation.org.uk/education-evidence/evidence-reviews/careers-education

DfE Careers Strategy

DfE Careers guidance

3
11. Collect feedback from parents through Parental questionnaires and surveys at every parents’ meeting Questionnaires have been a valuable tool in engaging parents with strategies in embedding a positive dialogue about their child’s learning

 

3,5
12. Implementation of parental portal on Edulink To improve communication with parents via online portals.

https://educationendowmentfoundation.org.uk/education-evidence/teaching-learning-toolkit/parental-engagement

3,5

Total budgeted cost: £825,494

Total budgeted cost £825,494
PP Funding £542,440
Overspend £283,054                   (excl. recovery fund)

Part B: Review of outcomes in the previous academic year

Pupil premium strategy outcomes

This details the impact that our pupil premium activity had on pupils in the 2020 to 2021 academic year.

Due to COVID-19, performance measures have not been published for 2020 to 2021, and 2020 to 2021 results will not be used to hold schools to account. Given this, please point to any other pupil evaluations undertaken during the 2020 to 2021 academic year, for example, standardised teacher administered tests or diagnostic assessments such as rubrics or scales.

If last year marked the end of a previous pupil premium strategy plan, what is your assessment of how successfully the intended outcomes of that plan were met?

A total of 528 pupils at Stepney All Saints were eligible for Pupil Premium (PP) funding in 2020-2021, because of the free school meals criteria. The breakdown of eligible pupils was:

Year 11 Year 10 Year 9 Year 8 Year 7 Total
Number of PP 111 98 114 108 97 528
% of cohort 54 48 55 52 52 51

Stepney All Saints has a high percentage of Pupil Premium students; 51% compared to the national average of 13% in 2019. This places the school in the highest PP eligibility band. The school is measured on the performance of our Pupil Premium students in comparison with non-Pupil Premium students nationally. The school primarily spends the funding on ensuring Pupil Premium students achieve outstanding progress that is at least in line, if not exceeding that of our non-pupil premium students.

In 2020-21 the Pupil premium funding was spent on the following:

Pupil Premium income (estimated)

£542,300

(September 2020 – August 2021)

Pupil Premium Actual

£534,800

(September 2020 – August 2021)

Category Budget allocation (£) Actual cost
Staffing costs for Curriculum Analysis £67,345* £67,345*
Booster classes/ Revision Programmes/ Saturday and holiday classes £62,649* £62,649*
Academic Tutors £197,718 £167,718
Accelerated Reading programme £3,500* £3,500*
Learning Support Assistants £161,534* £161,534*
Behaviour Support Assistants £83,355* £83,355*
Safeguard Software £3,581* £3,581*
KS3 Catch Up co-ordinator TLR £2,786* £2,786*
Learning Support Unit £60,230* £60,230*
Attendance & Welfare £40,428* £40,428*
Careers Guidance/ Work Experience £33,017* £33,017*
School Counsellor £30,513* £30,513*
Tower Hamlets Arts and Music Education Service (THAMES) £18,859* £18,859*
Enrichment – Cass Mountains for 5 groups £16,542 £0
Laptops £10,980
Total £779,541 £744,178
Overspend £237,241 £209,378

*these costs are all associated to permanent members of staff or services we buy. These continued throughout any periods of enforced closure.

In addition to the above costs, we decided the best way to mitigate some of the impact of Covid was to loan every child in the school with their own laptop. This incurred an initial cost and later was covered by our partners The Portal trust.

COVID School Closure – January 2021 to March 2021

As a result of national lockdown of school from January 2021 to March 2021, aspects of our Pupil Premium Strategy were suspended and new support measures were put into place to help pupils in receipt of pupil premium during lockdown:

Resources to support teaching and curriculum

Investment was made into the following resources:

KS3 progress 2020-2021

KS3 assessments took place in the final term of the academic year. Lockdown and isolation periods continued to disrupt learning and teaching through absences, illnesses that impacted on the general progress of all pupils.

A more coherent and systematic approach to KS3 assessment was developed and we continue to embed and consolidate practices. Departments have been asked to adjust their curriculum plans and schemes of learning to mitigate some of the impact of last year’s disruption to pupil learning.

Attendance summary

We knew that most pupils were disadvantaged by the lockdowns in both academic years affected and therefore maintaining high attendance was key for progress and wellbeing.

Pupil Premium attendance Non-Pupil Premium Overall attendance
Yr7 TBC TBC
Yr8 95.8% 95.6% 95.7%
Yr9 96.8% 96.3% 96.6%
Yr10 94.8% 96.9% 95.8%
Yr11 95.3% 97.5% 96.3%

Our overall attendance was high and met targets set for the school. We knew that the best chance of academic success starts with attending school every day and this has been a particular strength in 2020-21.

Rewards summary

Total # awarded Non-PP PP PP gap
bronze 903 445 444 -0.1%
silver 664 338 322 -2.4%
gold 239 122 113 -3.8%
platinum 14 4 10 +42.8%

On average, non-pupil premium students received slightly more rewards for bronze, silver and gold compared to Pupil premium students. However, a significantly higher number of students received the platinum award. A raffle was held for the platinum winners for the chance of receiving a min-iPad. Also, every child who achieved gold and platinum have will have the opportunity to go to the Harry Potter Studios in October 2021 as a reward for their achievements.

100% attendance

Yr7 (FSM6) Yr8 Yr9 Yr10 Yr11
Total with 100% attendance 73 58 63 51 84
Non PP 46 26 33 29 47
% PP 27 (#27) 30 (#32) 26 (#30) 22 (#22) 33 (#37)

 

A separate reward trip will be arranged in the autumn term for the pupils who achieved 100% attendance.

Music Tuition

An important service that is funded by the Pupil premium grant is the access to music tuition to increase the cultural capital of our pupils. This year 52% of the pupils that participated in music tuition were in receipt of the Pupil Premium grant. 86% of these participants are made up of KS3 pupils.

The focus for next year is to meet and exceed this in line with our PP funding and encourage pupils to take up the some of the less popular instruments such as guitar and brass instruments.

Duke of Edinburgh participation

Since November 2019, 70 pupils signed up to the Duke of Edinburgh award and of these 36 are Pupil premium which makes up 51.4% of participants. All activities that went ahead were set up remotely due to the bubble arrangements for health and safety.

> Click here to download a copy of the pupil premium strategy 2021-22

Pupil Premium Strategy 2020-21

Pupil Premium Strategy Statement: Stepney All Saints School 2020-21

*As a school, we have reflected on the impact of lockdown and centre assessed grades (CAG) and updated the strategy. We do not believe the 2020 data is reflective of the Pupil Premium Strategy that was planned for 2019-2020 and consequently the 2020 data cannot be used as an impact measure and hence the reason why it has been removed from the report as a comparison measure

1.   Summary information
School Stepney All Saints School
Academic Year 2020-21 Total estimated PP budget for academic year 2020-21 (Sept 2020 – August 2021)  £542,300

 

Date of most recent PP Review September 2020
Total number of pupils  1040 Number of eligible PP pupils this represents  536 (52%) Date for next internal review of this strategy October 2020

 

Codes:

PP – Pupil premium

RTS – Return to school strategy, within bubbles

PC – Post-Covid, once when we are no longer in bubbles

Progress

2018 result

Pupils eligible for PP (at SASS)

2019 result

Pupils eligible for PP (at SASS)

English Progress 8 Score 0.14 0.44
Mathematics Progress 8 Score 0.16 0.63
Progress 8 Score 0.19 0.7
Attainment 8 Score 49.58 53.88

Notes: PPG –  £955 pp/ LAC £2300/ Other eg. Adoption £2345

2.   Barriers to future attainment (for pupils eligible for PP including high ability)
 
 In-school barriers (issues to be addressed in school, such as poor literacy skills)
A.     High percentage (44%) of PP pupils have English as an additional language
B.     PP pupils make less progress in English than non-PP pupils
C. The attendance and participation of PP Students to enrichment activities / wider extra-curricular experiences
D. In-school analysis of mock data show that there is a gap in performance of PP vs non-PP performance, with PP performing less well, and PP final outcomes are reliant upon the intervention plans in place
 External barriers (issues which also require action outside school, such as low attendance rates)
E. Average attendance of PP pupils 95.23% (overall attendance was 96%)

Disadvantaged pupils lack of access to appropriate facilities and extra – curricular activities

 

3.   Outcomes
Desired outcomes and how they will be measured Success criteria
A.      Pupils eligible for PP in KS3 to make at least expected progress in English, Maths and Science 90% of Students eligible for PP in KS3 to make expected progress to meet their end of year predictions.
B.      To close the gap in achievement outcomes  at GCSE in English, Maths and Science for students eligible for PP Students eligible for PP in Year 11 to achieve Maths, English and Science GCSEs in line with non PP students
C.      Improved attitude to learning from the identified students. A reduction in the number of logged concerns. 100% attendance at extension classes.
D.      All PP pupils participate in enrichment and extracurricular activities Each PP pupil takes up minimum of one extra-curricular activity
E.      Close the gap between the mock and final examinations for PP pupils Gap between PP and non-PP pupils is minimal

 

4.   Planned expenditure
Academic year 2020-21
The three headings below enable schools to demonstrate how they are using the Pupil Premium to improve classroom pedagogy, provide targeted support and support whole school strategies.
     i.    Learning in the curriculum
Desired outcome Chosen action/approach

 

What is the evidence and rationale for this choice? How will you ensure it is implemented well? Staff lead Review of implementation Date assessed
A. Pupils eligible for PP in KS3 to make at least expected progress in English, Maths and Science Employ and use new TAs to provide literacy and numeracy intervention to support sustained improvement in Year 7/8 using SASS catch-up funding

 

Smaller teaching groups in English (and Maths and Science) – PC

 

Morning Intervention classes in English Maths and science – PC

To mitigate the impact of lockdown for Yr8 pupils as they were already catching up from transition into secondary school

 

 

 

 

Data shows that low attaining disadvantaged pupils do less well in English, Maths and Science

 

Low CATS results for year 7 pupils

 

·       Progress review at each tracking period

·       Regular monitoring of achievement in LM meetings,

·       Clear entry and exit data on reading ages for every student in KS3.

·       Student Voice

 

 

 

 

HODs English / Maths/

Science/

SENCo/

Catch-up Coord/

SLT

Term 1 –

Term 2

Term 3

 

 

 

 

 

Term 1

Term 2

Term 3

 

Term 1

Term 2

Term 3

Ensure the Accelerated Reading programme is targeted specifically at PP pupils GCSE and end of KS3 results showed that PP pupils did less well in English/literacy based subjects. ·       All pupils tested at start of programme and re-tested to assess progress

RTS – use online provision by the provider

HOD English / English Literacy lead Term 1

Term 2

Term 3

 

Embed schemes of learning to ensure KS3 curriculum is appropriate and assessments accurate to enhance progress to KS4.  All department to work on curriculum design to ensure schemes of learning are rich with wider learning opportunities and build skills needed in both KS4 & 5 ·        Dedicated inset days given to departments to plan in teams

·       Regular middle leader meetings to feedback on progress and share best practice

·       Line management meetings with SLT and departments

HODs/

NKO/

CDA

Term 1

Term 2

Term 3

 

Improved attitude to learning / motivation Provide funding for Music Tuition for all those pupils eligible for Free School Meals Direct funding ensures pupils from disadvantaged backgrounds get access to tuition that is normally unaffordable ·       Data collection points indicating progress of pupils.

·       Attendance and uptake of enrichment opportunities by PP is higher than non PP

·       Target PP on waiting list first

HOD Music/

HOD Performing Arts

Term 1

Term 2

Term 3

 

**
Provide opportunities for PP students to develop self-confidence and resilience though opportunities at the residential centre – PC PP students have less developed opportunities to develop these skills out of London and in a residential setting (limited to 30 pupils) – this is a focus in the SIP in the Enrichment strategy ·       Use the enrichment co-ordinator in school, working with Year 7 team in first instance to publicise and organise a trip.  Extend this through the Years so it becomes an entitlement for all KS3 students

RTS – Enrichment theme day for each year group

Enrichment Coord Term 1

Term 2

Term 3

 

B.Close the gap in achievement outcomes  at GCSE in English, Maths and Science  for pupils eligible for PP Deploy department  Academic Tutors to support in English, Mathematics and Science targeting PP Direct funding ensures that PP students do not face barriers to their learning

 

Temporary Academic tutors Employed during the year to enhance learning

·       Progress review at each tracking period

·       Progress monitored at half termly RAP meetings

BES/

HOD English, Maths & Science

Term 1

Term 2

Term 3

 

Ensure intervention is targeted at PP (in class, withdrawal of groups and during extension sessions) Funding allows for smaller withdrawal groups and targeted, bespoke intervention ·       KS4 exam data at the end of the academic year.

·       Progress monitored at half termly RAP meetings

 

SLT/

BES/

HODs

Term 1

Term 2

Term 3

 

Ensure that all Saturday and holiday  classes target PP pupils for intervention – PC Funding enables specific support to PP pupils and then benefit of additional tuition ·       Attendance data

·       Progress monitored at half termly RAP meetings

SLT/ BES/

NJO

 

Term 1

Term 2

Term 3

 
    ii.    Social, emotional and behavioural aspects of learning
Desired outcome Chosen action/approach What is the evidence and rationale for this choice? How will you ensure it is implemented well? Staff lead Review implementation Date
C – Improved engagement / attitude to learning from PP pupils Implement a Year 6-7 transition summer programme – PC

 

 

Pupils will have a one-day induction into school life with core subjects setting a summer project.

Tours of the school should acclimatise pupils to size.

Pupils with poor attendance from primary school including vulnerable pupils and SEND pupils are most likely to benefit from early intervention

·       HOY yr7 and SLT in charge of transition submit plans by spring term

·       Induction team training to ensure structured approached to the day where appropriate

·

RTS – team building activities delivered by Wise-up

·

HOY7/

NJO

Term 1

Term 2

Term 3

 

Increase capacity of DSLs and the implementation of the

Safeguard software and training

Teaching and support staff to promptly communicate safeguard concerns to the DSL in a confidential manner (as well as remote access) ·       Purchasing of Safeguard software

·       Comprehensive CPD for all staff

·       KCSIE updates are monitored via software

DSL team Term 1

Term 2

Term 3

Ensure that Homework Club is staffed by TAs for KS3 Direct funding for club targeting pupils with need.  PP students directly invited to attend clubs.

95% of PP should have attended one club in the academic year.

 

·       SENDCo / HOY 7 provide plan

·       Attendance reports from all clubs

·       Improved progress & attainment

·       Breakfast club should see an improvement in attendance and punctuality in the morning

ABE/

HOY7/

NJO

Term 1

Term 2

Term 3

 

Introduce a Breakfast club at KS3 – PC

 

Embedding  behaviour policy  and Inclusion strategy Continue to embed the inclusion strategy so that more pupils return to mainstream lessons

Ensuring that there is a dual purpose for the CLC supporting students through referrals for behaviour and subject  withdrawal

·       Tracking of referrals to CLC

·       Analysing attendance data

·       Analysing progress data of students who have been referred to the CLC

IC/

PMO

Term 1

Term 2

Term 3

 

** CLC breakdown
Use of Behaviour Progress Officers to target PP pupils’ attendance to schools

 

Preventative approach to working with PP pupils who may become disaffected.

 

Targeting students who have less than 96% attendance

HOYs provide SLT line-manager with list of pupils and review progress (half-termly)

Review Personal Attendance Plans (PAPs) at regular intervals

HOY/

SLT

Term 1

Term 2

Term 3

 

half-termly attendance breakdown

*Case study

Use school counselling service to provide drop-in service – RTS Concerns around increased need for well-being support because of pastoral contacts during lockdown. Use to support those who use the drop ins to have high attendance and improved outlook on current situation and school ·       Rate of service uptake is high

·       Lower safeguarding drop-ins and referrals

 

HOY/

SLT/

DSL/

PMO

Term 1

Term 2

Term 3

   
  iii.    Other approaches
Desired outcome Chosen action / approach What is the evidence and rationale for this choice? How will you ensure it is implemented well? Staff lead Review of implementation Date
C. Improved engagement /   attitude to learning from the identified students.

.

Ensure there is a wide range of extra-curricular trips and activities

– PC

Direct help to students to give access to enrichment; trips with particular focus on Theatre and museum venues.

 

Trips designed to enrich curriculum areas with particular focus on use of the Mountain Centre

·       Trips mapped throughout the year linked closely to the curriculum,  Enrichment Coordinator / HOY to track PP students and their access to trips (develop enrichment passport over 2 years)

RTS – Enrichment theme day for each year group

HOYs/ enrichment Coord/ NJO/

SLT

Term 1

Term 2

Term 3

 

 

** trips or enrichment in all subjects
Embed and monitor impact of new rewards system linked to academic attainment In order to positively affirm learning in the classroom and behaviour for learning we will continue to develop the breadth of rewards at Stepney All Saints School

More rewards for different students recognising all of their achievements.

·       Link SLT to attend year group rewards assemblies

·       Assemblies  to include all subjects and attitude to learning within the awards for Year groups,

·       behaviour data analysis.

SLT, HOYs Term 1

Term 2

Term 3

 

Embed the merit process for reward and praise for targeted groups.  Special focus on attendance rewards. Pupil voice has consistently shown pupils feel they should be rewarded for good effort. Pupils report they rarely receive rewards. ·       Achievement assemblies attended by SLT and governors

·       Monitor PP achievement in line with non PP

MD/ AHT/ DHT/ HOYs Term 1

Term 2

Term 3

 

Focus all extension, Half term and Easter revision classes on the needs of PP students

 

Direct intervention and revision targeted at PP pupils ·       Monitoring of PP pupils through RAP meetings.  Data collections should show continuous improvement NJO/

BES/

HODs

Term 1

Term 2

Term 3

 

Ensure the Careers programme is focussed on the needs of disaffected PP students RTS – Use online programmes/ workshops and activities where available Improved aspirations for all pupils / promotion of further and higher educational opportunities plus workplace opportunities ·       Monitoring to show all PP pupils take up a work experience placements and attend careers events e.g. Head to Head

 

MFU/

NKO

Term 1

Term 2

Term 3

 

D- Parental feedback and attendance at data meetings / parents’ evenings. Collect feedback from parents through Parental questionnaires and surveys at every parents’ meeting Questionnaires and parents survey conducted and every parents evening.  These are analysed and evaluated ·       Monitoring by AHT and through SLT meetings. NJO Term 1

Term 2

Term 3

 

Implementation of parental portal on SIMS Communication via online portals. Attendance to enrichment clubs notified ·       Monitored by data team and follow-up by HOYs Data team/

HOYs

Term 1

Term 2

Term 3

 

5.      Additional detail
 

Pupil Premium income (estimated)

£542,300

(September 2020 – August 2021)

Pupil Premium income (estimated)

£542,300

(September 2021 – August 2022)

Pupil Premium income (estimated)

£542,300

(September 2022 – August 2023)

Category Budget allocation (£) Budget allocation (£) Budget allocation (£)
Staffing costs for Curriculum Analysis £67,345 £69,197.43 £70,235.39
Booster classes/ Revision Programmes/ Saturday and holiday classes £62,649 £64,371.57 £65,337.14
Academic Tutors £197,718 £203,154.95 £206,202.27
Accelerated Reading programme £3,500 £3,500.00 £3,552.50
Learning Support Assistants £161,534 £165,976.23 £168,465.87
Behaviour Support Assistants £83,355 £85,647.71 £86,932.43
Safeguard Software £3,581 £3,635 £3,689.53
KS3 Catch Up co-ordinator TLR £2,786 £2,828 £2,870.42
Learning Support Unit £60,230 £61,886.32 £62,814.61
Attendance & Welfare £40,428 £41,037.00 £41,652.56
Careers Guidance/ Work Experience £33,017 £33,650.00 £34,154.75
School Counsellor £30,513 £31,352.00 £31,822.28
Tower Hamlets Arts and Music Education Service (THAMES) £18,859 £19,236.28 £19,524.82
Enrichment – Cass Mountains for 5 groups £16,542 £16,873.00 £17,126.10
Total £779,541 £798,710.49 £810,691.15
Overspend £237,241 £256,410.49 £260,256.65

 

 

Pupil Premium Strategy Statement: Stepney All Saints School 2019-20

Pupil Premium Strategy Statement: Stepney All Saints School 2019-20

1.   Summary information
School Stepney All Saints CofE Secondary School
Academic Year 2019/20 Total estimated PP budget for academic year 2018/19 (Sept 2018 – August 2019)  £553,520

 

Date of most recent PP Review October 2019
Total number of pupils  1008 Number of eligible PP pupils this represents  591 (58%) Date for next internal review of this strategy January 2020
Progress  
2018 result

Pupils eligible for PP (at Stepney All Saints)

2019 result

Pupils eligible for PP (at Stepney All Saints)

2019 results

All pupils at Stepney All Saints

Pupils not eligible for PP (national averages 2018)
English Progress 8 Score 0.14 0.44 0.52 N/A
Mathematics Progress 8 Score 0.16 0.63 0.52  N/A
Progress 8 Score 0.19 0.7 0.7 0.13
Attainment 8 Score 49.58 53.88 53.94 50.14
1.   Barriers to future attainment (for pupils eligible for PP including high ability)
 
 In-school barriers (issues to be addressed in school, such as poor literacy skills)
A.     High percentage (69%) of PP pupils have English as an additional language
B.     PP pupils make less progress in English than non-PP pupils
C. The attendance and participation of PP Students to enrichment activities / wider extra-curricular experiences
 External barriers (issues which also require action outside school, such as low attendance rates)
D. Average attendance of PP pupils 95.02% (overall attendance was 95%)

Disadvantaged pupils lack of access to appropriate facilities and extra – curricular activities

1.   Outcomes
Desired outcomes and how they will be measured Success criteria
A.     Pupils eligible for PP in Year 7 to make at least expected progress in English, Maths and Science 90% of Students eligible for PP in Year 7 to make expected progress to meet their end of year predictions.
B.     To close the gap in achievement outcomes   at GCSE in English, Maths and Science for students eligible for PP Students eligible for PP in Year 11 to achieve Maths, English and Science GCSEs in line with non PP students
C.     Improved attitude to learning from the identified students. A reduction in the number of logged concerns. 100% attendance at extension classes.
D.      All PP pupils participate in enrichment and extracurricular activities  Each PP pupil takes up minimum of one extra-curricular activity
1.   Planned expenditure
Academic year 2019/20
The three headings below enable schools to demonstrate how they are using the Pupil Premium to improve classroom pedagogy, provide targeted support and support whole school strategies.
     i.   Learning in the curriculum
Desired outcome Chosen action/approach What is the evidence and rationale for this choice? How will you ensure it is implemented well? Staff lead Review of implementation? Date assessed
A. Pupils eligible for PP in Year 7 to make at least expected progress in English, Maths and Science Employ and use new TAs to provide literacy and numeracy intervention to support sustained improvement in year 7

Smaller teaching groups in English (and Maths and Science)

 

Morning Intervention classes in English Maths and science

Data shows that low attaining disadvantaged pupils do less well in English

 

·         Progress review at each tracking period

·         Regular monitoring of achievement in LM meetings,

·         Clear entry and exit data on reading ages for every student in KS3.

·         CATS test for year 7 and 8 students

·         Student Voice

SBC/

HODs English / Maths/

Science/

SENCo

 

Ensure the accelerated reading programme is targeted specifically at PP pupils GCSE results showed that PP pupils did less well in English/literacy based subjects. ·         All pupils tested at start of programme and re-tested to assess progress HOD English / MD
Curriculum review and updated Schemes of learning to ensure KS3 curriculum is appropriate and assessments accurate to enhance progress to KS4.  All department to work on curriculum design to ensure schemes of learning are rich with wider learning opportunities and build skills need in both KS4 & 5 ·          Dedicated inset days given to departments to plan in teams

·         Regular middle leader meetings to feedback on progress and share best practice

·         Line management meetings with SLT and departments

HODs/

NKO/

CDAC

Improved attitude to learning / motivation Provide funding for Music Tuition for all those pupils eligible for Free School Meals Direct funding ensures pupils from disadvantaged backgrounds get access to tuition that is normally unaffordable ·         Data collection points indicating progress of students.

·         Attendance and uptake of enrichment opportunities by PP is higher than non PP

HOD Music/

HOD Performing Arts

Provide opportunities for PP students to develop self-confidence and resilience though opportunities at the Cass residential centre PP students have less developed opportunities to develop these skills out of London and in a residential setting ·         Use the enrichment co-ordinator in school, working with Year 7 team in first instance to publicise and organise a trip. Extend this through the Years so it becomes an entitlement for all KS3 students Enrichment Coord.
B.Close the gap in achievement outcomes at GCSE in English, Maths and Science  for pupils eligible for PP Deploy all Academic Tutors to support in English, Mathematics and Science Direct funding ensures that PP students do not face barriers to their learning

 

Temporary Academic tutors Employed during the year to enhance learning

·         Progress review at each tracking period

·         Progress monitored at half termly RAP meetings

SBC/

HOD English, Maths & Science

Ensure intervention is targeted at PP (in class, withdrawal of groups and during extension sessions) Funding allows for smaller withdrawal groups and targeted, bespoke intervention ·         KS4 exam data at the end of the academic year.

·         Progress monitored at half termly RAP meetings

 

SBC/

HODs

Ensure that all Saturday and holiday classes target PP pupils for intervention Funding enables specific support to PP pupils and then benefit of additional tuition ·         Attendance data

·         Progress monitored at half termly RAP meetings

SBC/ SLT/ NJO

 

    ii.   Social, emotional and behavioural aspects of learning
Desired outcome Chosen action/approach What is the evidence and rationale for this choice? How will you ensure it is implemented well? Staff lead Review implementation Date
C – Improved engagement / attitude to learning from PP pupils Implement a Year 6-7 transition summer programme.

 

Pupils will have a one day induction into school life with core subjects setting a summer project. Tours of the school should acclimatise pupils to size.  Pupils with poor attendance from primary will be targeted specifically ·         HOY yr7 and SLT in charge of transition submit plans by spring term

·         Induction team training to ensure structured approached to the day

SUS/

NJO

Ensure that Homework Club is staffed by TAs for KS3 Direct funding for club targeting pupils with need.   PP students directly invited to attend clubs.

95% of PP should have attended one club in the academic year.

 

·         SENCo / HOY 7 provide plan

·         Attendance reports from all clubs

·         Improved progress & attainment

·         Breakfast club should see an improvement in attendance and punctuality in the morning

GP/SUS

NJO

Introduce a Breakfast club at KS3

 

Embedding behaviour policy  and Inclusion strategy Continue to embed the inclusion strategy

 

Ensuring that there is a dual purpose for the CLC supporting students through referrals for behaviour and subject withdrawal

·         Tracking of referrals to CLC

·         Analysing attendance data

·         Analysing progress data of students who have been referred to the CLC

IC

VJ/PMO

Use of Behaviour Progress Officers to target PP pupils attendance to schools Preventative approach to working with PP pupils who may become disaffected.

 

Targeting students who have less than 96% attendance

HOYs provide SLT line-manager with list of pupils and review progress (half-termly)

Review Personal Attendance Plans (PAPs) at regular intervals

HOY/

SLT

   
   iii.   Other approaches
Desired outcome Chosen action / approach What is the evidence and rationale for this choice? How will you ensure it is implemented well? Staff lead Review of implementation Date
C. Improved engagement /   attitude to learning from the identified students Ensure there is a wide range of extra-curricular trips and activities Direct help to students to give access to enrichment; trips with particular focus on Theatre and museum venues.

 

Trips designed to enrich curriculum areas with particular focus on use of the Cass Mountain Centre

Trips mapped throughout the year linked closely to the curriculum, Enrichment Coordinator / HOY to track PP students and their access to trips HOY, SMA
Monitor impact of new rewards system linked to academic attainment In order to positively affirm learning in the classroom and behaviour for learning we will co

time to develop the breadth of rewards at Stepney All Saints.

More rewards for different students recognising all of their achievements.

Link SLT to attend year group rewards assemblies.

Assemblies to include all subjects and attitude to learning within the awards for Year groups,

behaviour data analysis.

SLT, HOY
Embed the merit process for reward and praise for targeted groups. Special focus on attendance rewards. Pupil voice has consistently shown pupils feel they need to be rewarded for good effort. Pupils report they rarely receive rewards. Achievement assemblies attended by SLT and governors

Monitor PP achieving in line with non PP

MD, AHT, DHT, HOY
Focus all extension, Half term and Easter revision classes on the needs of PP students

 

Direct intervention and revision targeted at PP pupils Monitoring of PP pupils through RAP meetings.   Data collections should show continuous improvement SBC/

BES

HODS

Ensure the Careers programme is focussed on the needs of disaffected PP students. Improved aspirations for all pupils / promotion of further and higher educational opportunities plus workplace opportunities Monitoring to show all PP pupils take up a work experience placement and attend careers events e.g. Head to Head MFU/

NKO

D- Parental feedback and attendance at data meetings / parents’ evenings. Collect feedback from parents through Parental questionnaires and surveys at every parents’ meeting Questionnaires and parents survey conducted and every parents evening. These are analysed and evaluated Monitoring by AHT and through SLT meetings. NJO
1.     Additional detail
In this section you can annex or refer to additional information which you have used to inform the statement above.

 

Pupil Premium income (estimated)

£553,520

(September 2019 – August 2020)

Pupil Premium income (estimated)

£553,520

(September 2020 – August 2021)

Pupil Premium income (estimated)

£553,120

(September 2021 – August 2022)

Category Budget allocation (£) Budget allocation (£) Budget allocation (£)
Staffing costs for Curriculum Analysis £65,543 £67,345 £69,197.43
Booster classes/ Revision Programmes/ Saturday and holiday classes £60,972 £62,649 £64,371.57
Academic Tutors £192,426 £197,718 £203,154.95
Accelerated Reading programme £3,342 £3,500 £3,500.00
Learning Support Assistants £157,211 £161,534 £165,976.23
Behaviour Support Assistants £81,553 £83,355 £85,647.71
Learning Support Unit £58,618 £60,230 £61,886.32
Attendance & Welfare £39,833 £40,428 £41,037.00
Careers Guidance/ Work Experience £32,401 £33,017 £33,650.00
School Counsellor £29,696 £30,513 £31,352.00
Tower Hamlets Arts and Music Education Service (THAMES) £18,489 £18,859 £19,236.28
Tower Hamlets Youth Sport Foundation £16,099 £16,542 £16,873.00
Enrichment – Cass Mountains for 5 groups £4,553 £4,700 £4,850.00
Total £760,736 £780,390 £800,732.49
Overspend £207,216 £226,870 £247,212.49

 

Pupil Premium Impact Report from 2019-20

>> View our Pupil Premium Impact Report 2019-20

 

Pupil Premium information from previous years

Pupil Premium Strategy Statement: Stepney All Saints School 2018-19

Pupil Premium Impact Report from 2018-19

>> View our Pupil Premium Impact Report 2018-19

1.   Summary information
School Stepney All Saints Secondary School
Academic Year 2018/19 Total estimated PP budget for academic year 2018/19 (Sept 2018 – August 2019)  £558,120

 

Date of most recent PP Review December 2018
Total number of pupils  1019 Number of eligible PP pupils this represents  618 (61%) Date for next internal review of this strategy January 2019

 

Attainment
2018 result

Pupils eligible for PP (at SAS)

2018 result

All pupils at Stepney All Saints 

Pupils not eligible for PP (national averages 2016)
English Progress 8 Score 0.11 0.21 N/A
Mathematics Progress 8 Score 0.15 0.2  N/A
Progress 8 Score 0.20 0.28 0.12
Attainment 8 Score 50.01 51.63 52

 

2.   Barriers to future attainment (for pupils eligible for PP including high ability)
 
 In-school barriers (issues to be addressed in school, such as poor literacy skills)
A.     High percentage (85%) of PP pupils have English as an additional language
B.     PP pupils make less progress in English than non-PP pupils
C. The attendance and participation of PP Students to enrichment activities / wider extra-curricular experiences
 External barriers (issues which also require action outside school, such as low attendance rates)
D. Average attendance of PP pupils 95.15% (overall attendance was 95.82%) PP pupils make up 49.35% of the PA students

Disadvantaged pupils lack of access to appropriate facilities and extra – curricular activities

 

 

3.   Outcomes
Desired outcomes and how they will be measured Success criteria
A.     Pupils eligible for PP in Year 7 to make at least expected progress in English, Maths and Science 90% of Students eligible for PP in Year 7 to make expected progress to meet their end of year predictions.
B.     To close the gap in achievement outcomes   at GCSE in English, Maths and Science for students eligible for PP Students eligible for PP in Year 11 to achieve Maths, English and Science GCSEs in line with non PP students
C.     Improved attitude to learning from the identified students. A reduction in the number of logged concerns. 100% attendance at extension classes.
D.      All PP pupils participate in enrichment and extracurricular activities  Each PP pupil takes up minimum of one extra-curricular activity

 

4.   Planned expenditure
Academic year 2018/19
The three headings below enable schools to demonstrate how they are using the Pupil Premium to improve classroom pedagogy, provide targeted support and support whole school strategies.
     i.   Learning in the curriculum
Desired outcome Chosen action/approach What is the evidence and rationale for this choice? How will you ensure it is implemented well? Staff lead Review of implementation? Date assessed
A. Pupils eligible for PP in Year 7 to make at least expected progress in English, Maths and Science Employ and use new TAs to provide literacy and numeracy intervention to support sustained improvement in year 7

Smaller teaching groups in English (and Maths and Science)

 

Morning Intervention classes in English Maths and science

Data shows that low attaining disadvantaged pupils do less well in English

 

·         Progress review at each tracking period

·         Regular monitoring of achievement in LM meetings,

·         Clear entry and exit data on reading ages for every student in KS3.

·         CATS test for year 7 and 8 students

·         Student Voice

EG/

HODs English / Maths/

Science/

SENCo

 

 

 

 

 

July 2019
Ensure the accelerated reading programme is targeted specifically at PP pupils GCSE results showed that PP pupils did less well in English/literacy based subjects. ·         All pupils tested at start of programme and re-tested to assess progress HOD English / MD  

Ongoing

Curriculum review and updated Schemes of learning to ensure KS3 curriculum is appropriate and assessments accurate to enhance progress to KS4. Introduction of Backward Planning SAS Curriculum  All department to work on curriculum design to ensure schemes of learning are rich with wider learning opportunities and build skills need in both KS4 & 5 ·          Dedicated inset days given to departments to plan in teams

·         Regular middle leader meetings to feedback on progress and share best practice

·         Line management meetings with SLY and departments

HODs/

SJ/NB

 

July 2019
Improved attitude to learning / motivation Provide funding for Music Tuition for all those pupils eligible for Free School Meals Direct funding ensures pupils from disadvantaged backgrounds get access to tuition that is normally unaffordable ·         Data collection points indicating progress of students.

·         Attendance and uptake of enrichment opportunities by PP is higher than non PP

HOD Music Feb 2019
Provide opportunities for PP students to develop self-confidence and resilience though opportunities at the Cass residential centre PP students have less developed opportunities to develop these skills out of London and in a residential setting ·         Use the enrichment co-ordinator in school, working with Year 7 team in first instance to publicise and organise a trip. Extend this through the Years so it becomes an entitlement for all KS3 students Enrichment Coord.  

 

 July 2019
B.Close the gap in achievement outcomes at GCSE in English, Maths and Science  for pupils eligible for PP Deploy all Academic Tutors to support in English, Mathematics and Science Direct funding ensures that PP students do not face barriers to their learning

 

Temporary Academic tutors Employed during the year to enhance learning

·         Progress review at each tracking period

·         Progress monitored at half termly RAP meetings.

EG/

HOD English, Maths & Science

 August 2019
Ensure intervention is targeted at PP (in class, withdrawal of groups and during extension sessions) Funding allows for smaller withdrawal groups and targeted, bespoke intervention ·         KS4 exam data at the end of the academic year.

·         Progress monitored at half termly RAP meetings.

 

EG/

HODs

 August 2019
Ensure that all Saturday and holiday classes specifically target PP pupils for intervention Funding enables specific support to PP pupils and then benefit of additional tuition ·         Attendance data

·         Progress monitored at half termly RAP meetings.

EG  

 

 August 2019
 
    ii.   Social, emotional and behavioural aspects of learning
Desired outcome Chosen action/approach What is the evidence and rationale for this choice? How will you ensure it is implemented well? Staff lead Review implementation Date
C – Improved engagement / attitude to learning from PP pupils Implement a Year 6-7 transition summer programme.

 

Pupils will have a one day induction into school life with core subjects setting a summer project. Tours of the school should acclimatise pupils to size.  Pupils with poor attendance from primary will be targeted specifically ·         HOY yr7 and SLT in charge of transition submit plans by spring term

·         Induction team training to ensure structured approached to the day

NCA/

NJO

July 2019
Ensure that Homework Club is staffed by TAs for KS3 Direct funding for club targeting pupils with need.   PP students directly invited to attend clubs.

95% of PP should have attended one club in the academic year.

 

·         SENCo / HOY 7 provide plan

·         Attendance reports from all clubs.

·         Improved progress & attainment

·         Breakfast club should see an improvement in attendance and punctuality in the morning.

GP/NCA

NJO

July 2019
Introduce a Breakfast club at KS3

 

Embedding behaviour policy  and Inclusion strategy Implementation of the new inclusion strategy employing a manager of Cass Learning Centre.

 

Ensuing that there is a dual purpose for the CLC supporting students through referrals for behaviour and subject withdrawal

·         Tracking of referrals to CLC

·         Analysing attendance data

·         Analysing progress data of students who have been referred to the CLC

IC

VJ/PMO

July 2019
Use of Behaviour Progress Officers to target PP pupils attendance to schools Preventative approach to working with PP pupils who may become disaffected.

 

Targeting students who have less than 96% attendance

HOYs provide SLT line-manager with list of pupils and review progress (half-termly) HOY/

SLT

 July 2019
 
   iii.   Other approaches
Desired outcome Chosen action / approach What is the evidence and rationale for this choice? How will you ensure it is implemented well? Staff lead Review of implementation Date
C. Improved engagement /   attitude to learning from the identified students.

.

Ensure there is a wide range of extra-curricular trips and activities Direct help to students to give access to enrichment; trips with particular focus on Theatre and museum venues.

 

Trips design to enrich curriculum areas with particular focus on use of the Cass Mountain Centre

Trips mapped throughout the year linked closely to the curriculum, Enrichment Coordinator / HOY to track PP students and their access to trips HOY, SMA  July 2019
Monitor impact of new rewards system linked to academic attainment In order to positively affirm learning in the classroom and behaviour for learning we will co

time to develop the breadth of rewards at Stepney All Saints Secondary School

More rewards for different students recognising all of their achievements.

Link SLT to attend year group rewards assemblies.

Assemblies to include all subjects and attitude to learning within the effort awards for Year groups

behaviour data analysis.

SLT, HOY  July 2019
Embed the merit process for reward and praise for targeted groups. Special focus on attendance rewards. Pupil voice has consistently shown pupils feel they need to be rewarded for good effort. Pupils report they rarely receive rewards. Achievement assemblies attended by SLT and governors

Monitor PP achieving in line with non PP

JJS, AHT, DHT, HOY  July 2019
Focus all extension, Half term and Easter revision classes on the needs of PP students

 

Direct intervention and revision targeted at PP pupils Monitoring of PP pupils through RAP meetings.   Data collections should show continuous improvement EG/BES

HODS

July 2019
Ensure the Careers programme is focussed on the needs of disaffected PP students. Improved aspirations for all pupils / promotion of further and higher educational opportunities plus workplace opportunities Monitoring to show all PP pupils take up a work experience placement and attend careers events e.g. Head to Head MFU/

SBC

July 2019
D- Parental feedback and attendance at data meetings / parents’ evenings. Collect feedback from parents through Parental questionnaires and surveys at every parents’ meeting Questionnaires and parents survey conducted and every parents evening. These are analysed and evaluated Monitoring by AHT and through SLT meetings. NJO  

 

 July 2019

 

5.     Additional detail
 

Pupil Premium income (estimated)

£558,120

(September 2018 – August 2019)

Category Budget allocation (£)
Staffing costs for Curriculum Analysis £55,606
Booster classes/ Revision Programmes/ Saturday and holiday classes £52,207
Academic Tutors £217,545
Accelerated Reading programme £3,457
Learning Support Assistants £177,500
Behaviour Support Assistants £108,807
Learning Support Unit £59,779
Attendance & Welfare £39,641
Careers Guidance/ Work Experience £32,953
School Counsellor £29,898
Tower Hamlets Arts and Music Education Service (THAMES) £11,193
Tower Hamlets Youth Sport Foundation £4553
Enrichment – Cass Mountains for 5 groups £16,099
Total £809,738
Overspend £251,618

 

 

 

Pupil Premium Academic Year 2017-18

1) The school’s pupil premium grant allocation amount

The Pupil Premium Funding is paid by the Local Authority on a Financial Year basis (April 2017 – March 2018). The Pupil Premium Funding for the Academic Year 2017-18 (September 2017 – August 2018) has not been received yet. We are meant to receive £252,826 for the period September 2017 – March 2018. The funding for the period April – August 2018 has not been released yet. Once it is released, the School will upload the details on the website.

2) A summary of the main barriers to educational achievement faced by eligible pupils at the school

Both Pupil Premium and non-Pupil Premium students face similar barriers to their educational achievement. Some barriers that our Pupil Premium students face are:

–           Literacy

–           English As Second Language (EAL)

–           Students with additional educational needs (SEND)

–           Home circumstances

–           Lack of access to extra-curricular experiences due to parents’ low income

 3) How we will spend the pupil premium to address those barriers and the reasons for that approach

We will spend the pupil premium funding on programmes, projects and initiatives which support the engagement and involvement of disadvantaged students. These include the following: 1-to-1 Tuition through Academic Tutoring, projects relating to behaviour, pastoral support, various Service Level Agreements with the Local Authority in order to support the disadvantaged students, Learning Support Assistants to support the SEND students, extra curriculum activities and afternoon clubs, revision programmes during half terms and Easter, Saturday classes, Summer School, trips subsidies.

Reasons for the above approach: The school’s current strategy is working as it is evident from the Pupil Premium Progress 8 and Attainment 8 results.

4) How we will measure the impact of the pupil premium

At four tracking periods across the year, data is collected and analysed, drawing attention to any gap in attainment or progress of pupil premium students across all subjects.  Students not making expected progress are targeted immediately for intervention, and their progress is monitored to ensure their achievement comes in line with national expectations.

View our Pupil Premium Impact Report for 2016-17

 5) The date of the next review of the school’s pupil premium strategy

We review the Pupil Premium strategies at least once every half term. We also report to the school’s Governing Body every term.

View our Pupil Premium Strategy 2017-18

View our Pupil Premium Impact Report 2017-18

Click here to view a letter from David Laws, MP, regarding the excellent progress of Sir John Cass Pupil Premium students

Pupil Premium Academic Year 2016-17

Pupil Premium Academic Year 2015-16